How to Celebrate New Year’s Sober

Restore Center

The New Year holiday can be a very challenging time for recovering alcoholics and addicts. Most New Year’s celebrations are filled with alcohol and even drugs. Sober living is not on most peoples’ to-do lists this time of year. Even people who don’t typically drink during the rest of the year will make an exception for December 31st. As the clock counts down to midnight, many adults will be at least slightly drunk and/or high. There is also a significant surge in the number of alcohol-related accidents at this time. With so much emphasis on partying, it can be difficult for those who are trying to quit or have already entered addiction recovery. That’s why it’s so important for those who want to maintain their sobriety to be vigilant and make a plan.

 10 ways to have a healthy, happy and sober New Year’s!

  1. Pray and Meditate.

    This will calm you down and help you to stay confident and in the present moment. There are so many positive health benefits to prayer and meditation!

  2. Drink bottled water when you’re out.

    This assures you are always drinking something that is unaltered, especially at wild New Year’s events. This will also keep you from picking up someone else’s drink by mistake.

  3. Attend 12-Step program meetings and sober parties before, after and even in-between New Year’s celebrations.

    Map out where and when all the 12-Step meetings are in your area. These can come in handy if negative feelings or temptations arise. You can get away to a meeting for an hour, share your feelings, listen to the experiences of others, get a hug, and then go back to the family and/or party reinforced and focused on enjoying life and sober living.

  4. Don’t be afraid to ask for help and support throughout the holiday.

    Addiction recovery isn’t easy and even impossible trying to do it completely alone. Talking about what you’re feeling and thinking with someone else who is also in sobriety can help you to stay calm, positive and focused.

  5. Stay in gratitude.

    New Year’s Eve is about just that – being thankful and excited that you have a new beginning! There are proven mental, emotional and physical benefits to making gratitude lists and cultivating appreciation for everything that you have.

  6. This is one of the most important tips:

    do not hang out with people that still drink and/or use! There’s a saying that goes, “If you hang around a hotdog stand long enough, you’re going to eventually buy a hot dog.” Bring in the New Year surrounded with those who are dedicated about their addiction recovery and yours as well.

  7. Come up with an arsenal of ways to turn down alcohol and drugs if you will be attending parties where those are present.

    People are offering, often trying to persuade you that “you can handle it.” When offered anything that would compromise your sobriety, having ways to ease out of the situation will make your New Year’s festivities much more enjoyable, and help keep you sober.

  8. Don’t take yourself too seriously.

    Be easy on yourself! Laugh, and find humor in every situation. Even if you’re not feeling your best, even forcing yourself to smile can actually make you feel better.

Sobriety is one of the greatest New Years Resolutions you can make for yourself. If you are looking into addiction recovery options, we can get you started on your road to sober living and an incredible new year!

Don't wait any longer!

For a drug and alcohol treatment center that truly cares, call Restore Drug Rehab today at (888) 519-1570.Verify Your Insurance Now

Start your recovery today

Contact us today for more information on our treatment programs. Our admissions coordinators are standing by for a free insurance verification

Break Free from Addiction Today

Free

Restore offers personal consultations and Insurance Verifications that are 100% Free

Simple

Call or chat to speak with one of our experienced and dedicated admissions coordinators

Secure

All your information is confidential. We would never sell or share with a third party without your consent